Recent Statistics on Choking

More statistics will be added to this section periodically.

  • In a 2011, a US National Safety Council report stated that choking caused 4,500 deaths (amongst all ages) in the United States in 2009.[Ref:1819]

  • A 2013 report stated that, from 2001 to 2009, an average of 12,435 children (14 years old or younger) per year were treated in US Emergency Rooms because of food-related choking.[Ref:375]

  • Choking and suffocation are responsible for almost 40% of unintentional injuries in infants under the age of one in Canada.[Ref:512]

  • For every choking-related death, an estimated 110 children are treated in hospital emergency departments for non-fatal choking.[Ref:1674]

  • The presence of older siblings in the household increases the risk for choking, possibly because toys and other objects with small parts are more likely to be present and caregiving activities, such as feeding, to be undertaken by older siblings.[Ref:1676]

  • The majority of deaths from choking and suffocation occur in the first year of life.[Ref:1674]

  • Approximately 95% of deaths from choking occur in the home environment.[Ref:375]

  • In Europe, one in 5 childhood choking injuries involve industrial products, such as plastic and metal parts, coins, and toys.[Ref:1476]

  • In the European Union each year, approximately 20 children (14 years or younger) die from choking on a toy.[Ref:1476]

  • In the European Union each year, an estimated 2,000 children (14 years or younger) choke on a toy.[Ref:1476]

  • In the European Union each year, an estimated 400 children (14 years or younger) die from choking.[Ref:1476]

  • In the European Union each year, an estimated 50,000 children (14 years or younger) have a choking episode.[Ref:1476]